Andrea Reay, IOM of Seattle Southside Chamber Graduates from two U.S. Chamber Foundation Programs

This four-month program is designed to train and equip leaders from state and local chambers of commerce with resources, access to experts, and a network of peers to build their capacity to address the most pressing education and workforce challenges.

  • Friday, January 25, 2019 10:47am
  • News

The following is a press release from the Seattle Southside Chamber of Commerce.

The Seattle Southside Chamber is proud to announce that President/CEO, Andrea Reay, IOM, has graduated from both the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation’s Institute for Organization Management as well as their inaugural Business Leads Fellowship Program.

The U.S. Chamber Foundation has educated tens of thousands with its professional development programs for association, non-profit, and chamber professionals.

The Institute for Organization Management has been fostering individual growth through interactive learning and networking opportunities since 1921. All IOM graduates complete 96 hours of course instruction in nonprofit management.

“Institute graduates are recognized across the country as leaders in their industries and organizations,” said Raymond Towle, IOM, CAE, the U.S. Chamber Foundation’s vice president of Institute for Organization Management. “These individuals have the knowledge, skills, and dedication necessary to achieve professional and organizational success in the dynamic association and chamber industries.”

Following a competitive application and selection process, Reay was also selected along with 34 other state and local chamber executives to participate in the inaugural Business Leads Fellowship Program.

This four-month program is designed to train and equip leaders from state and local chambers of commerce with resources, access to experts, and a network of peers to build their capacity to address the most pressing education and workforce challenges.

“I am so honored to have been part of this premier program to learn, network and gain insights on education and workforce development for our community in South King County,”said Reay when asked about the Business Leads Fellowship. “Poverty is a cancer that threatens to destroy the vibrancy of our community and education and workforce development is that cure that we know works. We can lift our community out of poverty; we can be the change, together we are stronger.”

Upon completion of both programs, Reay has received the recognition of IOM and has joined the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation’s dedicated network of 200 chambers of commerce and statewide associations from around the nation who regularly engage on education and workforce initiatives.

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