King County released lists of 2018 top pet names

Bella and Luna are among the list of top pet names for cats and dogs.

  • Wednesday, January 2, 2019 11:48am
  • News

Metropolitan King County Councilmember Reagan Dunn and Regional Animal Services of King County (RASCK) have released their annual list of the top names for dogs and cats in King County for 2018.

“Our furry friends are as much a part of our families as we are,” said Dunn. “This year I encourage everyone with a pet to make sure you license them – it protects them and helps keep our animal shelters running.”

“Pet licensing helps return lost pets to owners more quickly, and just as importantly, it provides shelter pets with the resources needed to give them a deserving second chance,” said Tim Anderson, RASKC Acting Manager. “Last year we celebrated a remarkable pet-save rate of 92 percent and had a banner year for pet adoptions. When pets are registered, it’s easier to protect them.”

This year, King County residents have registered 66,721 dogs and 27,432 cats. Despite the rivalry between cat-lovers and dog-lovers, King County pet owners found some common ground this year with six of the top ten names appearing on both lists. Here are the names that clawed their way to the top.

Dogs

  1. Bella
  2. Luna
  3. Charlie
  4. Daisy
  5. Max
  6. Coco
  7. Lucy
  8. Cooper
  9. Buddy
  10. Sadie

Cats

  1. Luna
  2. Max
  3. Bella
  4. Charlie
  5. Lilly
  6. Buddy
  7. Lucy
  8. Oliver
  9. Pepper
  10. Gracie

This list is derived from pet license applications submitted to RASKC, which serves nearly one million residents living in 24 cities and unincorporated communities throughout King County.

“Licensing your pet is good for them and your family, but it’s about more than that,” said Dunn. “You’re also doing your part so the Regional Animal Services of King County’s shelter can help thousands of other animals get well and find new homes. It’s important, humane work.”

If a licensed pet is lost, the finder can call the phone number on the pet’s tag – a service that is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week – to quickly reunite them with their owner. Pets receive a free ride home the first time they’re found, allowing owners to skip a trip to the shelter. Pet licenses also help fund RASKC and the important work it does.

In addition to handling lost pets and injured animals, pet license fees contribute to RASKC’s other vital duties, including animal neglect and cruelty investigations, spay/neuter programs, pet adoption services, and other work to humanely and compassionately assist local animals.

You can purchase pet licenses online, or at more than 70 convenient locations around the county, including many city halls and QFC stores. Learn more at Regional Animal Service of King County’s website, kingcounty.gov/pets.

For more information please contact LLuvia Ellison-Morales with Regional Animal Services of King County at LLuvia.Ellison-Morales@kingcounty.gov.

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