King County released lists of 2018 top pet names

Bella and Luna are among the list of top pet names for cats and dogs.

  • Wednesday, January 2, 2019 11:48am
  • News

Metropolitan King County Councilmember Reagan Dunn and Regional Animal Services of King County (RASCK) have released their annual list of the top names for dogs and cats in King County for 2018.

“Our furry friends are as much a part of our families as we are,” said Dunn. “This year I encourage everyone with a pet to make sure you license them – it protects them and helps keep our animal shelters running.”

“Pet licensing helps return lost pets to owners more quickly, and just as importantly, it provides shelter pets with the resources needed to give them a deserving second chance,” said Tim Anderson, RASKC Acting Manager. “Last year we celebrated a remarkable pet-save rate of 92 percent and had a banner year for pet adoptions. When pets are registered, it’s easier to protect them.”

This year, King County residents have registered 66,721 dogs and 27,432 cats. Despite the rivalry between cat-lovers and dog-lovers, King County pet owners found some common ground this year with six of the top ten names appearing on both lists. Here are the names that clawed their way to the top.

Dogs

  1. Bella
  2. Luna
  3. Charlie
  4. Daisy
  5. Max
  6. Coco
  7. Lucy
  8. Cooper
  9. Buddy
  10. Sadie

Cats

  1. Luna
  2. Max
  3. Bella
  4. Charlie
  5. Lilly
  6. Buddy
  7. Lucy
  8. Oliver
  9. Pepper
  10. Gracie

This list is derived from pet license applications submitted to RASKC, which serves nearly one million residents living in 24 cities and unincorporated communities throughout King County.

“Licensing your pet is good for them and your family, but it’s about more than that,” said Dunn. “You’re also doing your part so the Regional Animal Services of King County’s shelter can help thousands of other animals get well and find new homes. It’s important, humane work.”

If a licensed pet is lost, the finder can call the phone number on the pet’s tag – a service that is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week – to quickly reunite them with their owner. Pets receive a free ride home the first time they’re found, allowing owners to skip a trip to the shelter. Pet licenses also help fund RASKC and the important work it does.

In addition to handling lost pets and injured animals, pet license fees contribute to RASKC’s other vital duties, including animal neglect and cruelty investigations, spay/neuter programs, pet adoption services, and other work to humanely and compassionately assist local animals.

You can purchase pet licenses online, or at more than 70 convenient locations around the county, including many city halls and QFC stores. Learn more at Regional Animal Service of King County’s website, kingcounty.gov/pets.

For more information please contact LLuvia Ellison-Morales with Regional Animal Services of King County at LLuvia.Ellison-Morales@kingcounty.gov.

More in News

Jim Pitts stands on walkway overlooking filtration chambers at the King County South Treatment Plant in Renton. Aaron Kunkler/staff photo
Human waste: Unlikely climate change hero?

King County treatment plant joins effort to counteract effects of carbon dioxide.

Washington State Capitol Building. Photo by Emma Epperly/WNPA Olympia News Bureau
Legislation targets rape kit backlog

WA has about 10,000 untested kits; new law would reduce testing time to 45 days

File photo
Law enforcement oversight office seeks subpoena power

Organization has been unable to investigate King County Sheriff’s Office.

The 2015 Wolverine Fire in the Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest near Lake Chelan. Photo courtesy of Washington Department of Natural Resources/Kari Greer
Western Washington faces elevated wildfire risk in 2019

Humans cause majority of fires in state

Courtesy of kingcounty.gov
King County approves bargaining agreement with 60 unions

Employees will receive wage increases and $500 bonus.

Call for peace, unity, understanding

City, county and state leaders show support of Islam community in wake of massacre at New Zealand mosques

King County bail reform hinges on pretrial decision making

Data on inmates has shown that being held pretrial affects the likelihood of conviction.

State smoking age rising to 21 in 2020

Legislature approves change

A man addresses the King County Council during a public hearing March 20 at New Life Church in Renton. He presented bags filled with what he said was hazardous materials dropped on his property by bald eagles. Another speaker made similar claims. Haley Ausbun/staff photo
Locals show support for King County waste to energy plant

Public hearing on landfill’s future was held March 20 in Renton.

Defense Distributed’s 3D printed gun, The Liberator. Photo by Vvzvlad/Wikimedia Commons
‘Ghost gun’ bill moves to Senate committees

Legislation would make 3-D printed guns illegal.

King County Council with Sarah Reyneveld, chair of the King County Women’s Advisory Board. Photo courtesy of King County
King County proclaims March as Women’s History Month

This year’s theme is Womxn Who Lead: Stories from the past and how they influence the future.

A man addresses the King County Council during a public hearing March 20 at New Life Church in Renton. He presented bags filled with what he said was hazardous materials dropped on his property by bald eagles. Another speaker made similar claims. Haley Ausbun/staff photo
Locals show support for King County waste to energy plant

Public hearing on landfill’s future was held March 20 in Renton.