Tukwila City Council should spend revenues wisely | Letter to the editor

Budgeting is always about increasing expenditures, and revenue collections are up usually with the help of higher taxes. Accordingly, two questions need City Council answers prior to expenditures:

A. What is the expected return on investment (ROI)? (Definable benefits)

B. By what metric can the results be measured and logically/factually reported?

Recommendations for our City Council:

1. Exercise tougher fiduciary representation to keep spending reasonable by always insisting on optimum solutions lest we follow some major cities, states, counties and a U.S. territory or two that find themselves near insolvency/bankruptcy.

2. Exercise due diligence in taxing budgeting and spending. A big tax hike is coming soon: $47 per $100,000 of home values in our city for the public safety bond, $169 per year for Sound Transit 3 and possibly other tax increases by schools, port, city, county and state.

3. Honor the rule of law by enforcing it fairly and judiciously, not by accommodating sanctuary shelter for illegals as the city has done for several years.

4. Stop encouraging student protest and stop subsidizing Tukwila schools unless you equally subsidize other school districts that draw students from our city. Better yet, don’t subsidize any.

5. Negotiate union contracts out in the open (private sector unions do), so tax payers are privy to negotiations/settlements.

6. Commission a Fire Department (FD) study for eight-hour shifting prior to building three new stations with living quarters and reduce stations to three (two new). With state of the art instant communications and with transportation, end to end of our city, under emergency conditions around fifteen minutes, the status quo is unjustifiable. Eight-hour shifts work well for our police and hospitals which do related work and pass responsibility and authority from shift to shift. So our FD should abandon expensive living quarters and associated 48-hour shift which includes pay for maybe up to 50 percent idle time. Why build three new stations when two will do? Council action is demanded.

Aggressive fiduciary action and performance are expected of our council individually and collectively, and we need better assurances we’re getting it.

–Bill Holstine

[flipp]

More in Opinion

Washington State Capitol Building. File photo
Editorial: Taxpayers deserve down payment on tax reforms

By The Herald Editorial Board Reform of the state’s tax system wasn’t… Continue reading

Rep. Joe Fitzgibbon and Page Carson Foster. Photo credit Washington State Legislative Support Services
Carson Foster serves as page in Washington State House

The following was submitted to the Reporter: Carson Foster, a student at… Continue reading

State Dems may abandons caucus chaos in time for 2020

Washington also is considering becoming more significant by moving its primary to early March.

Are sheriffs above the law?

Washington voters have spoken on I-1639. Sheriffs need to set the stage to follow their oath of office - and enforce the law.

Parking issues should be addressed now rather than later

So let’s have a little update on Tukwila Village. Construction on the… Continue reading

Two commissioner positions available this year

For The Reporter The Tukwila Pool Metropolitan Park District (TPMPD) is a… Continue reading

Especially in an election year, our elected should do better

At first glance, the reinstitution of the Hazelnut, Issue 1 — looks,… Continue reading

When tomorrow becomes today: King County cities must tackle affordable housing

Microsoft has started the regional dialogue, but will cities rise to the challenge?

Representation matters

By Flip Herndon Tukwila Superintendent During the month of February we may… Continue reading

Why public libraries matter more than ever in the Information Age

Occasionally, someone unfamiliar with King County Library System will say to me… Continue reading

Tukwila Pool welcomes new water aerobics classes

By Laci Jamison The Tukwila Pool is excited to announce that we… Continue reading

With city budgets, come tough choices

In a previous column, I briefly touched on how our new public… Continue reading